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is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
. they are mostly used in environments for the environment, whether it be the sand in the desert or the jungle, it would interfere with the explosive. that has been traditionally their use. that being said, these things are easy to find, easy to make. i don't have to tell you, you can look up on the internet and see the step by step instructions out to do that. and matter of assembling the various ingredients you would do to put it together. that to expand on what he was saying, they are getting a lot of evidence how the bomb was made but they don't have a lot of evidence about who did this or why. the actual evidence that would lead to the person or persons involved. >> this suggests a slightly higher level of them what was first thought yesterday and if so, does that narrow down the net of potential suspects? >> it does. the black powder, the acetone, peroxide, you don't want to let it get went. absolutely right. you want to protect the explosives, the detonator. when this bomb went off, talked to a couple of people and their first reaction was what is happening to people coming back from af
in them and we, and we remove pellets and nails. >> stuff that could have come from the environment or concentrated enough to lead you to conclude that came from the bombs? >> i think they came from the bomb although i can not be exactly sure. >> how many amputations have you performed and how many more are planned. >> at this point if i have my numbers right we have performed four amputations and there are two more limbs that are at risk but i hope that we will save those legs. >> [inaudible]. critical condition or stable condition? and are they -- >> yes, they are in intensive care. they are in critical condition but at this point we stablized their vital signs and their hemo dynamic situation is under control. >> what are their injuries? can you describe what is -- [inaudible] >> most of the injuries were again lower extremity, major injuries and from these injuries they bled a lot. we controlled the bleeding rather rapidly, but, certainly they lost a lot of blood. that created physician logic problems. >> give an age range? >> do you have foreign nationals, any idea about the na
improvement. what does it feel like on the ground? do peel feel like we are in another high risk environment given this mass murder? >> i was in manhattan the day of 9/11. so it feels, it felt similar for maybe 10 or 12 hours but it seems like boston is back going about its day. not unlike the way new york kind of recovered as quickly as they did. i think one has to hope that the communicate responds quickly. that they're resilient. i think that the international nature of the boston marathon is helpful in an odd way at this point. people will go back to their countries and be as resilient as we need to be as americans. i think that these people who were engaged in this thing were out here living a purpose driven life. they were raising capital and raising funds for things that mattered to them. they were here for causes and in many instances and i think if the history is any judge, they'll be back to doing that very quickly. >> amen. thank you very much for that. >> up next, why would someone do this? we'll get into that question next. money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every
. the environment is not agreed to. >> a few minutes ago, the minority in the united states senate decided it was not worth it. they blocked common sense gun reforms even while the families looked on from the senate gallery. >> a big loss for president obama and big loss from the fam faps from newtown who traveled to washington to lobby lawmakers and they lost on the big amendment that was agreed to by democrat manchin and republican toomey. republicans that voted yes, toomey and kirk and collins from maine and mccain from arizona. democrats who voted no. hicamp from north dakota. prior from arkansas . begas from alaska and baucus and reid. >> at the white house it was technically more bipartisan. even hoe harry reid did vote the way he did. i was struck by the want president's comments just before we went on air when he let loose on with a tirade. now, i don't think it was likely anyway. but the president is not -- and that is the way he attacks today . if you read the president's comments simply on the attack of the fellow red state demdements. it is a searing indictment of them and the
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
no, but the good thing is that we're actually in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not genericall
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs, within the maritime environment. the coast guard is providing security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing surges in terms of ground transportation and the like. >> the head of the house homeland security committee saying the fbi has a serial number from the pressure cooker that is one of the explosive devices and there are trace chemicals in the powder he says can be traced by investigators to a manufacturer. the same applies to the ball bearings. on the hill a short time ago the attorney general sag no resource is being spared in the investigation. >> i want to assure you, the citizens of boston and all americans, we're working tirelessly to determine who was responsible for this incident. to the -- i have directed the full resources of the department be deployed to make sure this matter was thundershowerly investigated to prevent any future attacks occurring. >> we are hearing about this press conference, katherine, from the fbi. it will be, if it happens, the first in 48 hours two full days. what are we to m
and this guy, 19 years old, on the run and in an environment he doesn't know with just the shoes on his feet maybe has been able to elude. now, that's probably very lucky on his part but law enforcement sitting there right now with their fingers crossed hoping he's still in the area because they may not know where to look next, al. >> that's my point, james. lucky for him maybe. hopefully he doesn't have that luck. but scary for others. i mean, i'm an early riser. i wake up early this morning, 5:00 a.m., in the middle of the night both of them have been caught, one's dead, the other's at large, there's no way i would believe that at nightfall the next day he would still be at large. what could be the possible scenarios? i hear when clint or don say that he is maybe somewhere and came home from work but they were on lockdown. people didn't go to work. so what could be a scenario to comfort me if i'm a citizen in watertown? >> that's right, reverend al. i don't think we can give you total comfort. the superintendent laid out the reason it happened. he was clear, they had a tremendous shootout,
sweating in a cold environment. they're focused on what they're doing. they don't fit in with the crowd. so this is a way of actually, without the technology, but with the civilians or police or law enforcement officers actually looking for suspects in a crowd, these are some ways that you can actually find and detect a suspect like this. >> mike: you've been the pictures of the boston suspects. would they have given you cause for concern just by their appearances, the way they were behaving? >> no doubt, no doubt. immediately after the events, obviously, i was watching the video stream coming through. you can see that the crowd watching the finish of the boston marathon are watching the runners whereas these two were not watching the marathon at all. you know, they were very focused on where they were going. one was walking after the other, in a hurry, it seemed. their dress, their stride, the walk. there's a specific walk that a suspect of this nature has. a characteristic that a normal person, under normal circumstances, wouldn't have. so with the right training, even civilians can be le
for our country, this attack. whether or not we are living in an environment that looks more like israel and great britain under the ira where these sort of things happen and we become used to them. that is not a reality that any of us want to accept in this country. i wonder if the administration -- which side of this they will fall on. i think we will see from eric holder what their take is really on this when it comes down to the way it's prosecuted. any guthrie action to whether or not this -- gut reaction to whether or not this signals a change. >> reporter: i think they will say to try this american citizen through the normal civil courts, civilian criminal courts, and that may have a harder sell. i'm not saying that is not what is going to happen, i'm not saying that is not what the administration can do, but i think they need to make the case. remember at the height, martha, of the problems that the british had with terror attacks from the ira, they created a special set of courts named for a fabled british judge named lord diplock. they didn't use the formal process for certain
's absolutely the case in an environment, like the one you 1/2 syria, that proving chemical weapons use can be difficult. but we are engaged in a process of trying to investigate and verify these allegations. >> so it depends what the definition of chemical weapons is. that works to president assads a advantage, and at the same time it does give the white house some wiggle room when everybody goes back to the red line phrase. >> shepard: very valuable wiggle room. we're now hearing from the guy who says the boston bombing suspect carjacked him before they're wild chase and shootout with police. ahead, what he claims they told him and how he says he escaped. >> father and son canoe trip begins in horror after an alligator attacked the kid. an incredible story. >> shepard: this is "studio b." it's the bottom of the hour. time for the top of the news. chilling new details from the man who claims one of the boston terror suspects carjacked him at point and bragged to him about carrying out the bombings. police say the suspect stole the suv last thursday night. then led the cops on an overnight
the threat from canada. the environment has changed and whatever good this bill has, it's going to take a back seat right now. what do you say? >> well, look, whenever there's a crime, you saw this on the shootings, the murders in connecticut. people wanted gun control before the shootings, tried to exploit that tragedy. the people who are against high-skilled workers coming into this country, all the antiimmigrant groups, are against all immigrants, not just some, and they're already trying to exploit these murders in boston to attack immigration of everybody. i don't think it will work. the american people are smarter than that. yes, the fbi should good of bad guys, evidently they let some slip through their fingers, in the case of boston. but everything in this bill moves in the right direction for security and the american economy, and all the kind of questions you ought to have. shame on the people who tried to use the murders in boston to undermine immigration reform. i don't think they'll be able to do it. >> neil: all right. thank you very much. good seeing you again, grover nor
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
or placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> do you think that most people are critical at this point? [ inaudible ] it's really too early to say. >> how long will this process continue to be critical? hours? >> the younger patients will require operations tomorrow and serial operations over days. a lot of the injuries are soft tissue and vascular injuries and they have to be approached in kind of step-by-step. >> how about ear drums, are you seeing any shattered ear drums? >> we have seen at least one. for me and the residents to actually go right back around, particularly the people, in the operating room to get a good exam. >> can you give us more information on ages, hometowns? >> no, i'm sorry, i can't, actually. >> can you talk about the amput amputees, how many? >> i can't. i mean, a couple. [ question inaudible ] >> i don't know. there were no pediatric patients. the old evidence person i took care of was 71. >> you're a surgeon but still -- >> i mean, it's just depressing. we see accidents all the time, it's just depressing. >> in the course of your career, have
with it in such a really horrific environment. and people were able to do the things they had to do quickly, efficiently, it was really the most collaborative team effort that i have ever seen. i've been doing this now for over 20 years. i get involved in a number of other situations or events. really not to this extent. certainly not to the degree that we saw, with this one. but this is one that brought everybody to the table. and it was a remarkable effort from the people who dealt with the patients in the field to the ones who dealt with them in the hospital. it's difficult emotionally, when you're dealing with a very, very injured, young, young child. it raises more feelings, but i think the key is to be able to do what you do. and do it as quickly as you can. >> you've done an extraordinary job. you and your staff i want to thank you for your service, on behalf of everyone from around the world. i'm sure your actions saved a lot of lives. for that we're all incredibly grateful. thank you. >> thank you very much. >>> we'll be right back. zap technology. arrival. with hertz gold plus rewards, you ski
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
what they did? the unabomber, ted kaczynski was clearly sick. his motivation was environment or anti-technology. christopher dorner who terrorized the city of los angeles and killed four people, he did that apparently because of a grudge against the lapd, which was his former employer. the atlanta olympics bomber, he was an anti-abortion and anti-gay extremist. that's what motived the atlanta olympics bombing. the oklahoma city bombing was a militia-aligned racist. he had all sorts of anti-government motivations. how much should motive matter in responding to a mass casualty attack in the united states? does it only matter if that attack is tied to a larger group of organized people? and this we just experienced means he we should expect more attacks from those who have similarly motivated. the united states has claimed we are at war with a specific organization called al qaeda. but in the boston attack it turns out that as the initial interrogation report suggests, there was no operational relationship between al qaeda and the bombers, if no one assigned them this bombing, no one tr
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
in this environment or in that square. we have to check the integrity of the buildings. because of that the city is unable to release a time frame when the square will be reopened to the public, when people will come back to their businesses. jenna? jenna: more when we get it, mike. mike tobin live in boston today. jon: charges in connection with the boston terror attacks and the aftermath could come as early as today as investigators continue to look for answers. they want to know if dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother acted alone. but his serious injuries are slowing their progress. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington right now. so what are we learning about the fbi's contact with the suspect, catherine? >> reporter: a leading republican briefed by the assistant director of the fbi last night tells fox news the risch shun equivalent of the fbi sent a letter to the bureau that they suspected older brother was a islamist extremist and believe in their cause. tamerlan tsarnaev travel oversees in 6 months, in 2012, that was not on the fbi radar that he misspelle
environment to stay steady in yourself. if this young boy looked up to his brother, his brother was radicalized into a cult. he is empty to begin with. he is the vessel that could potentially be recruited into a religion that had veered into cult status. >> megyn: the older brother is seven years old. significant, and the parents had divorced. mother had returned to more radical form of islam and recruited tamerian with that. the father had been an attorney and worked as mechanic because he couldn't find the kind of work he wanted. yet the uncle of these two boys, he had troubles but he loved america and he loved it as the land of opportunity. it seems like these boys went very different way. got to run. up next former attorney general under president bush says there is enough evidence to call these bombings a case of jihad. critics are already slamming him. stay tuned. r family the very best in taste, freshness, and nutrition? it's eb. want to give them more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. eb's. the only eggs that make better taste and
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
. >> thanks, al. >>> up next, makeup that's good for you and the environment, right after this. hi, listen i think you could do better. oh no, he's a nice guy. no i'm talking abt your yogurt. see dannon oikos is so rich and thick and smooth. so smooth. in a national taste test dannon oikos fat free rawber flavor beat chobani 2 to 1. mmmm. stamos? look babe - i'm doing better. she means the yogurt. join us babe. try it for yrself. dannon oikos greek nonfat yogurt. ♪ dannon it'not a ndy bar. 130 calories 7 grams of protein the new fiber one caramel nut protein bar. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check th temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. or lasts longer. igarnier invents olia. a haircolor breakthrough. our first monia-ee permanent color, pored by oil. olia propepe color deep. pure, luminous, vivid color. visibly improves and restores hair. new olia by garnier. i'm over the hill. my bod'k the way it used to. past my prime? i'm a victim o
the situation. the safety of everyone that ntue to dovethgo wils always ensure a safe environment for our fans." this notion ofpoing events, like the boston marathon, which hasad us loong at other viously, we have tonn marathon on sunday, officials there is a that they are paying close attention to their security preparations, we have also got some other races, i chke john. n ancisco marathon in ju, billy broadtreet run in may, indiana 500 festiva in may. lansing, michigan, in april, and raon inapl.cnt music obvisl ainwee talking about no credie threats, but officials in boston said no credible threats before tha o either, john. >>recautions are necesry important, and detandable the celticsamn boston, canceled. doesn't really matter. the playoffs just around the corner. that game will not be made up. shannon travis, our thanks to you. one other story about a sporting event which reallyauty attention overnight. fans of the oakland a's in oakland, tryg to rally fans to start instead of let's go a's chant, a let's go bostonchant. that just shows you how fans and right now.he city country are repu
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
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